Ceramic & Glass

Knowledge of such properties as the thermal length change for the sintering of technical ceramics, phase transitions and the specific heat capacity for modified glass, and the precise thermal conductivity values for inorganic building materials is of high practical importance in this field.

In particular, Simultaneous Thermal Analysis (STA) is ideal for investigating issues such as the glass transition temperature of modified glass, the binder burnout of a polymer binder, the dehydration of ceramic materials and the decomposition behavior of inorganic building materials – also via the subsequent application of evolved gas analysis (QMS).

Dilatometry is the method of choice for investigating expansion and shrinkage behavior during ceramic sintering.

LFA, HFM and TCT are versatile methods for the precise determination of thermal conductivity.

Important properties of refractories are the bending strength at elevated temperatures, softening under load, and creep in compression. To determine these values, instruments specially tailored to this material group – such as the apparatus for determining refractoriness under load (RUL) and creep in compression (CIC), the apparatus for testing hot modulus of rupture (HMOR), the thermal conductivity tester (TCT), or the pyrometric cone equivalent (PCE) apparatus – are available.

Cordierite Ceramic — Firing
Glass — Thermal Expansion, Glass Transition, Softening
Polycrystalline Alumina — Thermal Expansion
Porcelain Raw Material — Mass-Loss Steps
Dolomite — Thermal Decomposition
Zirconia — Sintering
Phosphate Glass Powder — Glass Transition, Structural Change, Specific Heat
Silicon Nitride — Thermal Expansion
Fireclay Brick — Creep In Compression (CIC)
Mineral Fiber Insulation — Thermal Conducitvity
Glass Ceramic Zerodur — Thermal Expansion
Fired Tiles — Thermal Expansion
Alumina Green Body — Sintering
Fireclay Brick — Refractoriness Under Load (RUL)
Glass Wool — Phase Transitions
Glassy Carbon — Thermal Expansion
Gypsum and Quartz Sand — Phase Transitions
Glass Fiber Board — Thermal Conductivity